Graduation Year

Spring 2013

Document Type

Campus Only Senior Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts

Department

Psychology

Reader 1

Stacey Wood

Reader 2

Jennifer Ma

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© 2013 Marika R. McClenahan

Abstract

The current study investigated the effects of dispositional mindfulness on well-being conceptualized in two ways: as hedonic well-being and as eudaimonic well-being. These represent feeling well and functioning well, respectively. Mindfulness, a type of consciousness marked by a nonjudgmental, present centered awareness, was expected to relate more strongly with eudaimonic well-being. Data from 112 participants were collected through an online survey. The mechanisms emotion regulation, low rumination, attentive awareness to one's emotional states, and clarity and understanding of one's emotional states were examined as mediating variables between dispositional mindfulness and the two conceptualizations of well-being. Correlational analysis demonstrated that dispositional mindfulness is significantly correlated with both hedonic well-being and eudaimonic well-being, though more strongly related to eudaimonic well-being. Mediational analysis demonstrated that low rumination significantly mediated the relationship between dispositional mindfulness and hedonic well-being. Additionally, both low rumination and clarity and understanding of one's emotional states significantly mediated the relationship between dispositional mindfulness and eudaimonic well-being. Implications, limitations, and future directions of research are discussed.

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