Graduation Year

Spring 2014

Document Type

Campus Only Senior Thesis

Department

Psychology

Reader 1

Jennifer Ma

Reader 2

Sheila Walker

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© 2014 Elizabeth K. Jones

Abstract

The problem under investigation in this study is whether or not matching or mismatching learning style to learning style task has an effect on students’ perceptions of academic self-efficacy and self-efficacy for self-regulated learning. Sixty-eight undergraduate and graduate students over the age of 18 participated (males: N= 14 and females: N=54). The students were selected into two groups (matched; N=34 and mismatched; N=34). Participants in the matched group were given a free-writing task that matched their most preferred learning style as determined by the Kolb Learning Style Inventory. Participants in the mismatched group were given a free-writing task that matched their least preferred style of learning. Immediately after, participants were asked to rate their perceptions of academic self-efficacy and self-efficacy for self-regulated learning. There was a significant main effect for group and learning task on perceptions of self-efficacy; t(63.74)=2.10, p=.04. The educational implications of these findings are that teachers need to be sure that students’ learning style needs are being met in the classroom or else it could negatively effect perceptions of self-efficacy, and thus future learning.

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