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Abstract

Estonia’s integration policy vis-à-vis its Russian-speaking residents was developed and reformed several times since the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991. While comparative data from the international community certainly indicates that Estonia has progressed in the realm of social, political and societal integration, the ‘success’ for each individual policy is now increasingly measured—and contested— within broader considerations of geopolitical security and minority rights. The authors converge interview-based data compiled from various representatives and scholars of nongovernmental organizations, government agencies, and think tanks with secondary research on the topic of Russian minority integration in Estonia. The report will seek to address the ways in which various representatives in both mainstream and bottom-up organizations score and assess Estonia’s development in citizenship, education, and language policy domains for the Russian-speaking minority

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Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

 

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