Graduation Year

Spring 2012

Document Type

Campus Only Senior Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts

Department

Psychology

Reader 1

Gabriel I. Cook

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© 2012 Sae Bin Park

Abstract

One way people enhance their learning is through a desirable difficulty that makes the learning phase more difficult. The present research was devised to further explore these results and test the hypothesis that desirable difficulties benefits inductive learning by helping people engage in deeper processing strategies. In this experiment, participants were instructed to process perceptual disfluency and study different butterfly species that were presented in a clear or blurry manner. All participants were exposed to the interleaved and blocked conditions (within subjects), there was also a between subjects condition of fluent vs. disfluent. I hypothesized that subjects would perform better when presented with disfluency (blurry picture) because people would be able to engage in deeper processing strategies. This supported my hypothesis that desirable difficulties benefits inductive learning by engaging the subject in deeper processing.

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