Date of Award

Spring 2021

Degree Type

Open Access Dissertation

Degree Name

Education, PhD

Dissertation or Thesis Committee Member

Dina Maramba

Dissertation or Thesis Committee Member

Eligio Martinez

Dissertation or Thesis Committee Member

Linda Perkins

Abstract

California Assembly Bill 705 (AB 705) began full implementation in fall of 2020 for California community college English departments. This Bill requires schools to reconsider developmental education saying that students can no longer be required to take classes below transfer-level in English unless the school can show a student would not be able to succeed in college-level classes without that course. Additionally, there can no longer be sequences of multiple remedial classes as there were in the past, and schools can only offer classes one level below transfer. Students must be also now be recommended into courses using multiple measures and not assessment tests. The intent of the Bill is to prevent students from getting caught in remedial course sequences that frustrate them to the point of dropping out of college altogether. The purpose of this study is to interview English faculty from San Diego County community colleges to see what they are observing in the early implementation of AB 705. The Critical Policy Analysis framework will be used to see what teachers are noticing with their students and what is happening at their institutions in terms of distribution of power, resources, and knowledge, and if inequality and privilege exist because of this Bill. Findings and implications demonstrate that AB 705 appears to be helping students in some ways, but there are still concerns about some aspects of it because some students might still be left behind because of the Bill.

DOI

10.5642/cguetd/211

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